PPR’s Tools for Action Summer School  
UNISON (Galway House), Belfast 
Wednesday 17th and Thursday 18th August 2016
10-4pm daily

Click here to register now

Since 2006, Participation and the Practice of Rights (PPR) campaigns have been making real change at the grassroots across Northern Ireland. Using our unique Human Rights Based Approach, we have supported groups to achieve a £900,000 investment into a new sewage system in high rise flats, a new appointment system for people attending A&E in mental health crisis, and secured the first Equality Impact Assessment ever carried out on an Urban Regeneration project in Northern Ireland.  

Our participatory approach to human rights campaigning has been recognised by the United Nations as a good practice example of how communities can claim their rights. Our Tools for Action Summer School is your opportunity to learn more about this work.

 

Day One


Human Rights and Change
Introduction to international and domestic legislation which is intended to promote economic and social rights, including how these legislative standards are not translating into sustainable positive outcomes for the marginalized in society.
 
Rights as Relationships
Rights are commonly defined as something which can be claimed by individuals to be enforced by the state. However, rights can be more usefully seen as creating and regulating relationships of power within a society.
 
Challenging and Changing Process and Outcomes
Individuals and groups can employ innovative and effective campaigning to get a ‘win’ on particular issues. However, for these ‘wins’ to be sustainable and transferable to other marginalized groups, the existing processes of economic and social decision making must be changed.
 
How Power Responds
PPR groups have experienced a range of responses from state bodies and government Ministers. The response of some state bodies reveals the resistance to implementing economic and social rights, despite an obligation to do so. PPR groups have developed innovative ways of pre-empting and responding to institutional resistance.
 

Day Two

The Time is Right - The Time is Now

“Recognise this fundamental issue from the very beginning - change will always come at the speed of those who don’t want it to happen, rather than the speed of those who do. If you don’t take charge of change then those who resist it in the first place will still control the speed and time of change.” Inez McCormack, Founder and Adviser to PPR
 

PPR Methodology
Economic and social rights place obligations on states to ‘progressively realise’ rights using the ‘maximum available resources’. The PPR approach turns these obligations into participatory tools which empower marginalized groups to monitor the states’ activities.
 
What We Know About Change
PPR groups have experienced a range of responses from state bodies and government Ministers. The response of some state bodies reveals the resistance to implementing economic and social rights, despite an obligation to do so. PPR groups have developed innovative ways of pre-empting and responding to institutional resistance.